Update to Scoring

I realized there is an inherent flaw in my current scoring. Certain formats will inherently get low scores because of the format. I’ve been comparing all formats on the same level when this isn’t fair. So, I’ve created new scoring based on format.

 

YouTube/Internet Videos

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test

2) Strength of the directing

3) Strength of the visual content

4) Did I enjoy it?

5) Would I recommend it?

Total Scores out of 25

 

Videogames

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test

2) Strength of the writing

3) Strength of the directing

4) Strength of the voice acting

5) Strength of the game design

6) Strength of the editing

7) Strength of the sound design

8) Strength of the game play

9) Did I enjoy it?

10) Would I recommend it?

Total scores out of 50

 

Unscripted/Documentary

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test

2) Strength of the story

3) Strength of the directing

4) Strength of the visual content

5) Did I enjoy it?

6) Would I recommend it?

Total scores out of 30

 

Scripted Film & Television

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test

2) Strength of the writing

3) Strength of the directing

4) Strength of the acting

5) Strength of the cinematography

6) Strength of the editing

7) Strength of the sound design

8) Strength of the production design

9) Did I enjoy it?

10) Would I recommend it?

Total scores out of 50

“The Devil Wears Prada” (2006) by David Frankel

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Directed by: David Frankel

Written by: Aline Brosh McKenna (screenplay), Lauren Weisberger (novel)

Starring: Anne Hathaway, Meryl Streep, Adrian Grenier, Emily Blunt, Stanley Tucci

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test: 5

2) Strength of the writing: 5

3) Strength of the directing: 5

4) Strength of the acting: 5

5) Strength of the cinematography: 5

6) Strength of the editing: 5

7) Strength of the sound design: 5

8) Strength of the production design: 5

9) Did I enjoy it? 5

10) Would I recommend it? 5

Score: 50/50

“The Favourite” (2018) by Yorgos Lanthimos

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Directed by: Yorgos Lanthimos

Written by: Deborah Davis & Tony McNamara

Starring: Olivia Colman, Emma Stone & Rachel Weisz

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test: 5

2) Strength of the writing: 4

3) Strength of the directing: 5

4) Strength of the acting: 5

5) Strength of the cinematography: 5

6) Strength of the editing: 4

7) Strength of the sound design: 4

8) Strength of the production design: 5

9) Did I enjoy it? 5

10) Would I recommend it? 3

Score: 45/50

Netflix’s “Bird Box” (2018)

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Based on: “Bird Box” by Josh Malerman

Written by: Eric Heisserer

Directed by: Susanne Bier

Starring: Sandra Bullock, Trevante Rhodes, John Malkovich, Sarah Paulson, Jacki Weaver

 

1) Where is it on following the Bechdel Test: 5

2) Strength of the writing: 5

3) Strength of the directing: 5

4) Strength of the acting: 5

5) Strength of the cinematography: 5

6) Strength of the editing: 5

7) Strength of the sound design: 5

8) Strength of the production design: 5

9) Did I enjoy it?: 5

10) Would I recommend it? 5

Score: 50/50

Why “Crazy Rich Asians” is a Female Empowerment Movie

I’ve spent the past few days thinking about my viewing of “Crazy Rich Asians”. I quite enjoyed it, although it wasn’t a perfect movie. There were some characters that lacked development, for example, but I was able to get over that pretty quickly. If anything, because of the major milestone it has with representation.

But, I’m not here to talk about that since I’ll let those voices share their stories and why this is important to them. (incidentally, if you want to read a great article about the mahjong scene, check this out:

http://blog.angryasianman.com/2018/08/what-was-really-happening-in-crazy-rich.html)

What stood out to me were the strong female characters. And I’m not talking about 1 or 2. I’m talking about 5+ strong female characters that all get their stories told. Let’s visit a few of them, shall we?

The film opens with Eleanor (Michelle Yeoh) fighting for her right to be in a hotel. She has small children around her, doing her best to be the head of the family while also standing up for her rights. This strength is seen throughout the film, especially as she feels it her duty to stand up for who her son should marry. Whether you agree with her morals and tactics is a whole other conversation. The point is she knows what she wants and she fights for it.

Rachel Chu (Constance Wu), poo-poo-ca-chu, doesn’t need a man. Sure, she loves Nick (Henry Golding) but she also knows she doesn’t need him. In fact, she gives him up for his happiness and is very okay to live a life without him. She’s proud to be a professor and is more than ready to head back to New York to continue her life in that way.

Kerry Chu (Tan Kheng Hua), we find out, left an abusive marriage, moving to New York City to create a better life for her young daughter, Rachel. She even gave up the man she truly loved to save Rachel. And, I found the moment at the end of the mahjong scene beautiful when we don’t realize Kerry is there. But she is, for her daughter. Not because her daughter needs her there but she wants to be there for her daughter.

Goh Peik Lin (Awkwafina) is a force to be reckoned with in her own right. The fact that she has multiple outfits in her car for any given occasion shows she knows exactly what she wants. And, she does it.

And, one more character to discuss for now: Astrid (Gemma Chan).

I’d say she was the character I found I rooted for the most. I haven’t read the book but in researching her character it sounds like her arc varies from the movie. And, I would say that her character is one of the least developed characters in the movie. But, I still rooted for her. From the beginning, she’s trying to find her place. She is a part of this opulent family with lots of money yet wants to fit in with her husband by hiding her purchases.  But, it’s clear that she enjoys shopping. She has a huge struggle and it continues through the end.

I found it very beautiful when her husband gets out of the car on the way to the wedding and she then goes without him. I didn’t find she went because of shame, but because she desired to go. And, it’s clear she had huge examples in her life of other strong women, including that of her grandmother. Her grandmother was her date at the end, not her husband. She went as a powerful woman standing next to another powerful woman.

There are themes about tradition vs modern life, family cultures vs social cultures, etc. But, no matter if the character is following the long-held traditions or if they are embracing the modern culture, these women are all strong. They know what they want and the fight to get it.